The "Ready Player One" trailer mildly freaked me out

Discussion in 'Media and Video Games' started by Shipyard Locked, Nov 6, 2017.

  1. Baulderstone

    Baulderstone Legendary Member

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    Freaks and Geeks, unlike Stranger Things, had the benefit of being of being made by people who were actually there. It get every detail right.

    It's funny to me how the the Boomer nostaligia is being compacted into the current '80s nostalgia products. One of the touchstones of Stranger Things is the book It. That was written in the '80s, but it was very much about kids in the '50s. By using it as part of their template, Stranger Things has imported 50's cliches in to the '80s such as the bully in Stranger Things being a switchblade wielding 50's tough dressed up in '80s clothes.

    And, of course, the recent movie of It, just imports the entire thing into the '80s.

    I liked Stephen King's books as a teen in the '80s, but I still found them stodgily old-fashioned and uncool in a lot of his places. Any time a character would wax rhapsodic about stale classic rock, I would recoil a little.

    One of the most notable things about '80s pop culture is just how many different underground music scenes there were, all fleeing what was on the radio at the time.

    I guess it helps that the '80s mixes of today are highly selective. If you look at that songs that made the top 10 for their year in the '80s, there are a lot of terrible songs that time has buried.

    Just look at the top 5 songs of 1986. The most popular song of the year was "That's What Friends Are For", followed by "Say You, Say Me", "I Miss You", "On My Own" and "Broken Wings". That's a lot of treacle and the only one of those that is likely get played on an "*80's station" now is "Broken Wings".At #7, you have Eddie Murphy's "Party All the Time". And does anyone else remember when "Always" by Atlantic Starr was inescapable?

    If you want to break kids today of '80s nostalgia, I suggest a mandate that '80s stations must play the actual top hits of the era in full. Truth in nostalgia![/quote][/QUOTE]
     
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  2. Ladybird

    Ladybird Active Member

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    GW liberally "borrowing" ideas from anybody else? Surely not.
     
  3. Baulderstone

    Baulderstone Legendary Member

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    Of course not! I would be shocked at the idea of any RPG borrowing ideas from other works.
     
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  4. Stevethulhu

    Stevethulhu Well-Known Member

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    Especially Games Workshop. I mean they'd never steal terms and images whole cloth from Micheal Moorcock!
     
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  5. dragoner

    dragoner Active Member

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    A good designer does not imitate, they steal.
     
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  6. dragoner

    dragoner Active Member

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    This is why I hate discussions of 80's nostalgia because someone always has to mention how it really was, now I have to go drive my car and scrub the ear worm of Broken Wings with something loud. Here in Indiana I say they found an ideal time, 78-79 or so, and then never really left, wait, did that Berlinetta just cut me off? Grrr .... That makes 80's music simultaneously both new and nostalgic.
     
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  7. Ladybird

    Ladybird Active Member

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    Indeed. It's always been the way, it's how artistic development works.
     
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  8. Shipyard Locked

    Shipyard Locked Well-Known Member

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    Read the comments section from this youtube posting of "Always" and be disabused. :grin:



     
  9. Baulderstone

    Baulderstone Legendary Member

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    I came into this thread trying assuage your fears, but you just killed all my hope for the future.
     
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  10. Endless Flight

    Endless Flight Administrator Administrator Moderator

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    My 15 year old daughter, who's been raised on music from the 1950s to the present, told me in the car that the music from the 80s was better than current music.
     
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  11. Stevethulhu

    Stevethulhu Well-Known Member

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    I can believe that. And I speak as someone who utterly despised chart music from the 80s.
     
  12. Ladybird

    Ladybird Active Member

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    I guess it depends on what you're into; the 80's aren't exactly a good decade for trip hop, frex.

    But I still feel we're in a golden age for entertainment media. We've got all the old stuff that was actually good, and has stood the test of time, at our fingertips. We've also got the new stuff constantly coming - and we can enjoy it for what it is now, even if most of it ultimately won't last. And we've got all those influences combining for the next generation of creatives to work with.
     
  13. Endless Flight

    Endless Flight Administrator Administrator Moderator

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    Technology has made it much easier to enjoy older media. We have a family Spotify account and we all love it. Can listen to stuff (well most of it) pretty much at a thought's notice.
     
  14. The Butcher

    The Butcher Legendary Member

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    Spotify is the gold standard against which I measure every streaming service and find them all wanting. Netflix, Amazon, get your shit together.

    Spotify has also expanded my musical horizons considerably and I can spend hours hopping across genres from recommendation to recommendation.

    That being said, I think the 80s are a fantastic decade if you're into rock in general. Which I am. :smile:
     
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  15. Shipyard Locked

    Shipyard Locked Well-Known Member

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    Bringing this back a bit to the original topic via the musical genre of vaporwave I was alluding to earlier, I found this quote on TV tropes:

    "Global capitalism is nearly there. At the end of the world there will only be liquid advertisement and gaseous desire. Sublimated from our bodies, our untethered senses will endlessly ride escalators through pristine artificial environments, more and less than human, drugged-up and drugged down, catalysed, consuming and consumed by a relentlessly rich economy of sensory information, valued by the pixel. The Virtual Plaza welcomes you, and you will welcome it too."
    —Adam Harper in his initial Dummymag article[​IMG] on Vaporwave
     
  16. Endless Flight

    Endless Flight Administrator Administrator Moderator

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    Me too. I know there is awful awful stuff from the 80s, but that's the way it is every decade. I heard "Don't Rock The Boat" in a store while I was working today and I wanted to run. In my opinion, the best stuff from the 80s is better than the best stuff from any other decade barring the 60s.
     
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  17. Stevethulhu

    Stevethulhu Well-Known Member

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    I'd argue for the 70s setting the benchmark. But the 80s gave us so many of my favourite bands. And the awful acromyn with great music that was the NWOBHM.
     
  18. dragoner

    dragoner Active Member

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    Most of the NWOBHM bands were from the 70's; the 70's was the standard, it gave us all the metal/punk and everything glorious, 80's was the time of sperry topsiders.
     
  19. Stevethulhu

    Stevethulhu Well-Known Member

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    They formed in the 70s, but made their name in the period 79-82. So that's mostly 80s :tongue:

    Seriously, though. Apart from me, who cares about bands like Tygers of Pan Tang or Diamond Head these days?
     
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  20. dragoner

    dragoner Active Member

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  21. Baulderstone

    Baulderstone Legendary Member

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    I'm going to be a pain in the ass and argue that the '70s still hadn't ended in 1982, so it is all the '70s. ;)
     
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  22. Stevethulhu

    Stevethulhu Well-Known Member

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    I'd counter that with the 70s actually ended in '77 when the likes of The Clash, The Sex Pistols and The Damned kicked the whole Punk thing into the mainstream. Forever killing off flares, nylon shirts and brown corduroys. As well as such 70s icons as the Prog Rock movement. God I hated brown cords.

    Now you could make a case for the New Romantics and their pastel suits or the post-punks with their reggae and their compressed and chorused guitar tones were the real start of the 80s. Is that getting too technical? It sounds technical. Or that advances in synth technology combined with the can-do DIY ethic of punk was the true start of the 80s.

    But for me, it's always going to be sweaty guys playing to sweaty pubs and clubs through cranked up Marshalls. As exemplified by this 1979 classic.

     
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  23. Baulderstone

    Baulderstone Legendary Member

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    I can live with that.
     
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  24. BedrockBrendan

    BedrockBrendan Member

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    I think by the mid to late 80s, it had become something new though. I like both decades for music (though not a big punk fan). But I feel like all the stuff that happened in the 70s, really crystalized in the 80s into something more stark. When you listen to a lot of those 70s metal bands, the line between rock, hard rock, blues and metal is pretty blurred (which isn't a bad thing at all). But by the mid to late 80s, the metal aesthetic is pretty well understood by the musicians and fans. But you don't get that aesthetic without the 70s, and arguably the best bands came out of that period. Take out bands like Poison, and the 80s had some really great music in my opinion. The 90s, is the decade I always had the biggest trouble with musically.

    Also: How did the thread get here from Ready Player One? (I came in hoping for the hot take on that).
     
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  25. Bunch

    Bunch Active Member

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    Ready Player One is an homage to the 80's. And a little bit to the late 70's.
     
  26. Baulderstone

    Baulderstone Legendary Member

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    It seemed like in the '80s, there was a the big music industry pumping out safe and/or established acts, and there were small labels serving niche markets. If you were willing to dig a little, there was a lot going on. With the early '90s, the big labels suddenly wanted "alternative" and a lot of the smaller music scenes got poisoned by the attention. The other big change was that '90s were when corporate chains really increased their stranglehold on radio. Suddenly, the quirky alternative station near me that played a mix punk, rap, goth metal blues, reggae, and industrial now just played "alternative rock" like Bush and Matchbox 20.
     
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  27. Mankcam

    Mankcam Active Member

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    Yeah the 1980s was great for the Alternative Scene everywhere, it was the cool scene underneath all the gloss of the commercial 1980s. Pity I was still in school, it was hard to get to the really cool stuff beyond all the MTV clips, but if you knew the right places then Alt Music was very hip. The 1990s initially were awesome with more exposure to alt music rock bands, but it all became very commercial and bloated after a few years. Here in Australia in the late 90s there was a big Indie reaction to the US commercialisation of the alternative music scene, with many folk/rock/dance festival scene acts loosely gathered together by the Triple J radio umbrella. It was great for a time, but by 2010 the scene had been diluted and commercialised to an extent, just like what happened in the USA, although perhaps it still retains a little less marketing straight-jacketing. It's still nowhere near as free-wheeling or vibrant as it used to be, except perhaps with some of the more edgy Electronica acts.
    It's the nature of these things I suppose.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017 at 7:47 PM
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  28. Mankcam

    Mankcam Active Member

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  29. Mankcam

    Mankcam Active Member

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    If I was a moderator, you would see my red text voice after posting 'Always' by Alantic Starr, heh heh that was just too harrowing to hear again
     
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  30. Voros

    Voros Active Member

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    80s punk/post-punk/whateverthefuckyouwannacallit is great stuff.
     
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  31. Endless Flight

    Endless Flight Administrator Administrator Moderator

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  32. Mankcam

    Mankcam Active Member

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    Sounds as fresh as the Spidey Homecoming soundtrack heh heh
     
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  33. Endless Flight

    Endless Flight Administrator Administrator Moderator

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    I realize that "I Wanna Be Sedated" was actually released in 1978, but I always associated it with the early 80s. Honestly, with Van Halen and other Los Angeles-based acts and New Wave coming on the scene, rock had started to turn a corner anyway.
     
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  34. Mankcam

    Mankcam Active Member

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    Yeah post-punk and garage rock still sounds more fresh and edgy than the prog rock, hard rock, and even grunge rock that followed. A big influence on many underground alternative rock acts. Such a cool vibe, like having 1960s surf guitar rifts thrashed out to the max. Sounds like an iconic endless college party

    Speaking of such, just putting the Femmes out there:
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2017 at 1:31 AM
  35. Stevethulhu

    Stevethulhu Well-Known Member

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    That's why I say the 80s really started in 1977. At least for rock music. The genre underwent a huge paradigm shift that culminated in what is now called Hair Metal and Thrash Metal. And much of the reason for this can be traced to a combination of two bands. Van Halen changed the game in terms of guitar playing and songwriting style. While Motorhead changed the game in terms of aggression and image. Between the two, with a few other bands playing their parts, the foundations of 80s rock were laid in the late 70s.
     
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  36. Bunch

    Bunch Active Member

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    And being ore internet days it could take a few years for something to make it to your local area
     

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